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“Bel and the Kittens” is the first in a new series of Foxfield Railway stories for children to be published in time for Christmas.   The story tells of the adventures on the railway of  two children from Dilhorne, of the engine driver Mr Barnabas Pyke and the magical owl Ee’boo.  Proceeds will help fund the restoration of further Knotty coaches and help run Lower Moss Wildlife Hospital.  

 

The book is written by Richmond Warner and beautifully illustrated by Sarah-Leigh Walton.

 

Knotty Running Days in 2017

September 23rd and 24th.

© 2017 The NSR Rolling Stock Restoration Trust. Registered Charity No 1127895

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Travelling on the 4.00pm departure of the Knotty Heritage Train at Foxfield on September 3rd was Arnold Bennett himself, played by Ray Johnson, who, with Virginia Meir, read excerpts from his stories and plays, courtesy of the Arnold Bennett Society.

As part of the celebration of 150 years since Arnold Bennett's birth, all passengers on the 4.00pm train were given replica NSR tickets for "Knype" (Stoke), and Caverswall Road station was renamed "Bursley" (Burslem)!

Bel and the Kittens to be Published 20th November

September 3rd Arnold Bennett Readings

 

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On July 28th Knotty Coach Trust supporters visited the workshops of Stanegate Restorations of Haltwhistle where the Knotty coach bodies are restored.   It was a great day out and many thanks to Sara and Dave for their hospitality.   Below are photos of the party (courtesy of Mark Smith).   As our esteemed chairman Ron Whalley is obscured from the main photo we have added a separate one of him, just in case anyone can’t remember what he looks like, (unlikely!)
The coach in the background is NSR 1st class coach No. 228, presently awaiting restoration.

 

Visit to Stanegate Workshops

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Passengers were encouraged to wear period clothing, (and there was some to borrow).
Arnold Bennett was the Potteries’ very own literary genius, the great chronicler of life as it was in the “five towns” (actually there are six…..) in Victorian and Edwardian times.

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